Embryo Testing

Today, I received the paperwork with our PGD Chromosome Aneuploidy Screening. Our four embryos tested on day 5, B quality blastocysts (this was reported from our embryologist at our clinic), all had 46 chromosomes. They are listed in a “confidence” level, meaning “*the confidence for a chromosome call is an estimate of the probability that the call is correct.” Each chromosome has a percentage to show the confidence of each. Our embryos all rate 95% and above for every chromosome. I’m not quite sure what all this means just yet. We have an appointment with our doc on May 14 and we can ask more questions. There is a notation that says “*confidences < 85% for chromosomes where aneuploidy could result in a liveborn are flagged” which I guess means that above 85% should be considered a relatively trustworthy result. I’m so glad and feeling so extremely blessed that these results came out this way. I had no idea what to expect. Even though I am impatient beyond reason at this point, I am thankful that we had the guidance to move forward with this testing. It has given me a peace of mind that I would have otherwise been lacking. *These statements are taken directly from the results page from Natera.

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Big Day

Today was a big day. We met with the financial consultant (signed papers). We also met with our IVF nurse (medication and injection info AND signed more papers) and I began to chug 32 oz. of water. We were also informed that due to my egg health (low AMH), we would be doing a dual trigger. The additional medicine would be put into our pharmacy to arrive with the other medications. Then, we were off to the trial embryo transfer (TET) with a very full bladder.

Nurse checked it first, then Doc showed up and applauded my “good job” (haha) of filling my bladder sufficiently. I wanted to ask how many ladies pee on him in the process, but I refrained (yes, I was afraid I was going to do this, so I had a change of clothes in the car). The transfer was complicated by an obstruction of sorts and Doc said he would explore further with the following hysteroscopy. He was still able to pretty easily get the catheter right where it needed to be. Doc left and the nurse did our doppler ultrasound. My blood flow didn’t seem to be as free as they would like, so I will continue to avoid caffeine and inform my acupuncturist, increasing appointments to twice a week.

The hysteroscopy revealed the tissue complicating the TET and Doc was able to make necessary changes that will hopefully make our real FET (frozen embryo transfer) a breeze.

A big day. A good day.

Prep for Day One

Yesterday, I met with my new acupuncturist. I look forward to working with her more. We have appointments set up for another this week and then once a week through egg retrieval near the end of February.

Today was my first day of oral contraceptives to prepare for day one of ivf stimulation drugs.

Tomorrow, both of us go in to have blood drawn for some labs they want to run prior to starting the stimulation meds.

Next week, we both go in for about 3.5 hours of injection training, financial planning, and more tests. They will do an analysis for him and a doppler ultrasound (to check blood flow), hysteroscopy (a camera analysis of the uterus), and a trail embryo transfer (no embryos involved for now).

At this time, the official “day one” is February 14, but I feel like today is the first day one. I know this process will not come to conclusion until sometime near the end of April or beginning of May, but I can’t help get excited. After this, we will know more than we know now. We may have some answers. We may have a baby or few!

An IUI cycle with Injectables

One IUI cycle with letrozole and injectables looks like this:

Day 2: Transvaginal Ultrasound & blood tests
Day 3: Letrozole pills
Day 4: Letrozole pills
Day 5: Letrozole pills
Day 6: Letrozole pills
Day 7: Letrozole pills
menopur shot foronemenopurshot

Day 8: menopur shot

Day 9: menopur shot

Day 10: Transvaginal Ultrasound & blood test
hcg trigger shot foronehcgshot

Day 11: IUI

Day 13: luteal hcg foronelutealhcgshot

Day 16: luteal hcg

Day 19: luteal hcg

Day 28: Home Pregnancy Test

Luteal HCG

Anybody heard of it? I don’t see much information out there, so here is my experience so far. 

I am scheduled to have an HCG shot every three days after my IUI. I was nervous when I received the box of syringes and needles at my door, but it wasn’t all that bad. The stick was hardly a pinch and by recommendation from a you.tube video, I pushed the plunger slowly rather than forcing all the medication in quickly. I haven’t noticed any side effects from the HCG other than breaking out everywhere, but that was happening before the injection (maybe it’s from the letrozole I took on days 3-7?). 

The IUI nurse told me that the luteal HCG will encourage the corpus luteum to make all those things that support the “pregnancy” that will hopefully be happening very soon, including progesterone. They will then do bloodwork on the last day of HCG injections and three days after as well to check the progesterone level. With these injections, I am told not to take a home pregnancy test until 12 days after my last shot. Hoping for a quick trip to 20 days past IUI and a +HPT, please : )

Update: The luteal HCG gave me lots of pregnancy symptoms, of course (hot flashes, a little nausea, light-headed, super hungry, unusually tired, tender breasts/nipples, gas, mild constipation). I was worried I wouldn’t be able to wait to 17 dpiui, but my next cycle started exactly one week after my last HCG shot, no need to test (bbt fell from 98.2 to 97.3). My progesterone was quite high, so it did serve its purpose.

IUI #1

Of course, things can’t go the way that would be convenient… My ovulation tests didn’t detect a surge until I went in for an ultrasound this morning. That means a Sunday IUI it is! Excited, but I feel bad making people work on a Sunday morning.

The ultrasound this a.m. showed one follicle in my left ovary that was as big as my whole ovary! I didn’t know they did that. There was a little fluid around the follicle which evidently means that it is in the beginning stages of ovulation. We could have done the IUI today, but since we were told our best opportunity would be tomorrow morning, we’re going that way instead.

The femara/letrozole didn’t have any side effects that I could tell of other than the extremely sensitive scalp, which the DHEA caused before all on its own. I have the HCG which arrived the other day in the mail. The needles freaked me out. I’ll learn how to do that part tomorrow after the IUI and I might google for some videos just to be prepared.

I am so thankful to have met people along this journey who can share their experiences. I have also relished reading all the success stories and messages of hope. Thanking you all for sharing your journeys!